Talking Sense Podcast

A podcast providing a behind-the-scenes look into the aims and outcomes of the Talking Sense project, including recorded versions of all our researchers’ gallery talks, originally delivered in the Ashmolean Museum. Podcast series produced by Christy Callaway-Gale and Jonathan (Jonny) Lawrence, with oversight from project co-organisers Hugo Shakeshaft and Helena Guzik.

 
 

Episode 1: Introducing Talking Sense

In this episode, Christy and Jonny introduce the Ashmolean-TORCH interdisciplinary research project. They interview Hugo Shakeshaft and Helena Guzik, the project co-ordinators, and discuss the project with two other participants, focusing on their research and why they joined Talking Sense.

 

Episode 2: Talking Sense Behind the Scenes

In this episode, Christy and Jonny discuss the workshop days, which were a part of the working group's aims. In these workshops, we discussed recent scholarship on the senses and this is reviewed by Christy and Jonny in discussion. At the end of the episode, Jonny interviews Dr Jim Harris, the Ashmolean lead on the project and Teaching Curator.

 
 
Perfume burner. Probably made by Desiderio da Firenze (active 1532–1545). Padua, c. 1540–1550. Bronze, with traces of gilding. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased (France, Madan, Russell, Bouch and Miller Funds) with the aid of the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Art Fund (with a contribution from the Wolfson Foundation), the Friends of the Ashmolean, the Elias Ashmolean Group, Mr Phillip Wagner, and other private benefactors, 2004 [WA2004.1]

Perfume burner. Probably made by Desiderio da Firenze (active 1532–1545). Padua, c. 1540–1550. Bronze, with traces of gilding. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased (France, Madan, Russell, Bouch and Miller Funds) with the aid of the National Heritage Memorial Fund, the Art Fund (with a contribution from the Wolfson Foundation), the Friends of the Ashmolean, the Elias Ashmolean Group, Mr Phillip Wagner, and other private benefactors, 2004 [WA2004.1]

 

Episode 3: “The Senses & Disease: A Renaissance Perfume Burner and a Victorian Poisonous Bookcase” – PART 1

In this episode, Christy Callaway-Gale (DPhil Student, Medieval and Modern Languages) examines a Renaissance Italian perfume burner to discover the sensory world of disease. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Amélie Bonney (DPhil Student, History of Science). Listen to Episode 4 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Aga-Oglu, Mehmet. “About a Type of Islamic Incense Burner.” The Art Bulletin 27.1 (1945): 28–45.

Cahill, Patricia A. “Take Five: Renaissance Literature and the Study of the Senses.” Literature Compass 6.5 (2009): 1014–1030.

Cavallo, Sandra. “Health, Air and Material Culture in the Early Modern Italian Domestic Environment.” Social History of Medicine 29.4 (2016): 695–716.

Cavallo, Sandra and Storey, Tessa (eds.). Conserving Health in Early Modern Culture: Bodies and Environments in Italy and England. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017.

Cavallo, Sandra and Storey, Tessa. Healthy Living in Late Renaissance Italy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Hannaway, Caroline. “Environment and Miasmata.” Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine, vol 1. Eds. W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter. London: Routledge, 1993, 292–308.

Johnson, Geraldine A. “In the Hand of the Beholder: Isabella d’Este and the Sensual Allure of Sculpture.” Sense and the Senses in Early Modern Art and Cultural Practice. Ed. A. Sager and S.T. Kulbrandstad Walker. Ashgate: Ashgate Press, 2012, 183–197.

Nutton, Vivian.  “Humoralism.” Companion Encyclopedia of the History of Medicine, vol 1. Eds. W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter. London: Routledge, 1993, 281–291.

Palmer, Richard. “In bad odour: smell and its significance in medicine from antiquity to the seventeeth century.” Medicine and the Five Senses. Eds. W.F. Bynum and Roy Porter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, 61–68.

Perfume Burner, Small Island Case. Permanent exhibition held at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford [Exhibition catalogue].

Welch, Evelyn. “Scented Buttons and Perfumed Gloves: Smelling Things in Renaissance Italy.” Ornamentalim: The Art of Renaissance Accessories. Ed. M. Bella Mirabella. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2011, 13–39.

 
 
Great bookcase. Made by Henry Stacy Marks (1829–1898), Thomas Pritchard Rossiter (1818–1871), Sir Edward John Poynter (1836–1919), Henry Holiday (1839–1927), William Holman Hunt (1827–1910), Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882), William Frederick Yeames (1835–1918), Albert Joseph Moore (1841–1893), Thomas Morten (1836–1866), Simeon Solomon (1840–1905), Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833–1898). London, 1856–1862. Carved, painted and gilded furniture. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased, 1933 [WA1933.26]

Great bookcase. Made by Henry Stacy Marks (1829–1898), Thomas Pritchard Rossiter (1818–1871), Sir Edward John Poynter (1836–1919), Henry Holiday (1839–1927), William Holman Hunt (1827–1910), Dante Gabriel Rossetti (1828–1882), William Frederick Yeames (1835–1918), Albert Joseph Moore (1841–1893), Thomas Morten (1836–1866), Simeon Solomon (1840–1905), Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833–1898). London, 1856–1862. Carved, painted and gilded furniture. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased, 1933 [WA1933.26]

 

Episode 4: “The Senses & Disease: A Renaissance Perfume Burner and a Victorian Poisonous Bookcase” – PART 2

In this episode, Amélie Bonney (DPhil Student, History of Science) examines a toxic Victorian bookcase to discover the sensory world of disease. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Christy Callaway-Gale (DPhil Student, Medieval and Modern Languages). Listen to Episode 3 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Primary sources

Fowler, Thomas, Medical Reports of the Effects of Arsenic, in the Cure of Agues, Remitting Fevers, and Periodic Headaches, (London, 1785).

Thackrah, Charles Turner, The Effects of Arts, Trades, and Professions, and of Civic States and Habits on Living, on Health and Longevity, (London, 1831).

Report of the Royal Commission on the Employment of Children in Trades and Manufactures not Regulated by Law, First Report, 1863, xviii (3170). 

Secondary sources

Earl, Bryan, The Cornish Arsenic Industry, (Cornwall, 1996).

Feller, Robert L. (ed.), Artists’ pigments: a handbook of their history and characteristics, vols. 2 and 3, (Cambridge, 1986).

Jütte, Robert, ‘Classifications: The Hierarchy of the Senses’, in Robert Jütte and James Lynn (eds.), A History of the Senses, (Cambridge, 2005), p. 54–71.

Thistlewood, Jevon, ‘An Examination of William Burges’s Great Bookcase’, The Decorative Arts Society Journal, 2017, p. 27–33.

Whorton, James C., The Arsenic Century. How Victorian Britain was poisoned at Home, Work and Play, (Oxford, 2010).

Winterbottom, Matthew, ‘Not Acceptable to Present Taste: William Burges’s Great Bookcase’, The Decorative Arts Society Journal, 2017, p. 15–25.

 
 
Puzzle jug. Britain, 13th–14th century. The Ashmolean Museum [AN1921.202]

Puzzle jug. Britain, 13th–14th century. The Ashmolean Museum [AN1921.202]

 

Episode 5: “Sensory Intoxication: Getting Drunk from Oxford to Iran” – PART 1

In this episode, Sian Witherden (DPhil Student, English) uses a medieval puzzle jug to explore how drunkenness and intoxication play a big role in the visual culture of the senses and our understandings of how the body interacts with the outside world. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Jonathan Lawrence (DPhil Student, Oriental Institute). Listen to Episode 6 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Classen, Constance. The Museum of the Senses: Experiencing Art and Collections. London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.

Hinton, D. A. Medieval Pottery of the Oxford Region. Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 1973.

Hook, M. and MacGregor, A. Medieval England: Archaeological Collections in the Ashmolean Museum from Alfred the Great to Richard III. Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 1997.

Jaboulet-Vercherre, Azélina. The Physician, the Drinker, and the Drunk: Wine’s Uses and Abuses in Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Turnhout: Brepols; 2014.

Rose, Susan. The Wine Trade in Medieval Europe 10001500. London: Continuum, 2011.

Wakelin, Daniel, ed. Revolting Remedies from the Middle Ages. Oxford: Bodleian Library, 2018.

 
 
Tiles depicting Yusuf appearing before the women of Memphis. Iran, 2nd half of the 19th century. Fritware, moulded, with polychrome underglaze painting. The Ashmolean Museum, Presented by Miss H. Croker, 1953 [EAX.3135]

Tiles depicting Yusuf appearing before the women of Memphis. Iran, 2nd half of the 19th century. Fritware, moulded, with polychrome underglaze painting. The Ashmolean Museum, Presented by Miss H. Croker, 1953 [EAX.3135]

 

Episode 6: “Sensory Intoxication: Getting Drunk from Oxford to Iran” – PART 2

In this episode, Jonathan Lawrence (DPhil Student, Oriental Institute) looks at an Iranian tile scene to explore how drunkenness and intoxication play a big role in the visual culture of the senses and our understandings of how the body interacts with the outside world. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Sian Witherden (DPhil Student, English). Listen to Episode 5 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Scarce, Jennifer M. ‘Yusuf and Zulaikha - Tilework Images of Passion’, James Allan, ed., Islamic Art in the Ashmolean Museum, Part Two, Oxford Studies in Islamic Art, 10 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995).

Bashir, Shahzad. Sufi Bodies: Religion and Society in Medieval Islam (New York: Columbia University Press, 2011).

Kugle, Scott Alan. Sufis & Saints' Bodies: Mysticism, Corporeality, & Sacred Power in Islam. Islamic Civilization & Muslim Networks (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007).

Zargar, Cyrus Ali. Sufi Aesthetics: Beauty, Love, and the Human Form in the Writings of Ibn 'Arabi and 'Iraqi. Studies in Comparative Religion (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2013).

Floor, Willem M. Wall Paintings and Other Figurative Mural Art in Qajar Iran. Costa Mesa, Calif.: Mazda Publishers, 2005.

Jāmī, and Rogers, Alexander. The Book of Joseph and Zuleikhá: Historical Romantic Persian Poem. London: David Nutt, 1892.

 
 
Attic black-figure pottery stemmed cup depicting a symposiastic scene. Attica, 530–515 BC. Pottery, with painted and incised decoration. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased, 1974 [AN1974.344]

Attic black-figure pottery stemmed cup depicting a symposiastic scene. Attica, 530–515 BC. Pottery, with painted and incised decoration. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased, 1974 [AN1974.344]

 

Episode 7: “Altered States of Body: The Power of the Senses in Ritual and Revelry” – PART 1

In this episode, Dr Hugo Shakeshaft (Postdoctoral Researcher, Classics) analyses a Greek symposium cup to show how objects have the power to transform us, engaging the senses to alter the body. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Helena Guzik (DPhil Student, History of Art). Listen to Episode 8 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

J. Boardman, Athenian black figure vases: a handbook, London 1991.

T. Carpenter, Dionysian imagery in Archaic Greek art, Oxford 1986.

F. Lissarrague, The aesthetics of the Greek banquet, Princeton 1990.

O. Murray, The symposion: drinking Greek style: essays on Greek pleasure, 1983–2017, Oxford 2018.

 
 
Pilgrim stamp. India, c. 1880–c. 1890. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.467]

Pilgrim stamp. India, c. 1880–c. 1890. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.467]

 
Pilgrim stamp. India, 2nd half of the 19th century. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.469]

Pilgrim stamp. India, 2nd half of the 19th century. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.469]

Pilgrim stamp. India, 2nd half of the 19th century. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.471]

Pilgrim stamp. India, 2nd half of the 19th century. Brass. The Ashmolean Museum [EAX.471]

Episode 8: “Altered States of Body: The Power of the Senses in Ritual and Revelry” – PART 2

In this episode, Helena Guzik (DPhil Student, History of Art) analyses Indian pilgrim stamps to show how objects have the power to transform us, engaging the senses to alter the body. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Dr Hugo Shakeshaft (Postdoctoral Researcher, Classics). Listen to Episode 7 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Banerjee-Dube, Ishita. Divine Affairs: Religion, Pilgrimage, and the State in Colonial and Postcolonial India. Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study, 2001.

Bharati, Agehananda. "Pilgrimage in the Indian Tradition." History of Religions 3.1 (1963): 135–167.

Branfoot, Crispin. "Pilgrimage in South Asia: Crossing Boundaries of Space and Faith." In Pilgrimage: The Sacred Journey, eds. Ruth Barnes and Crispin Branfoot. Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2006.

Eade, John, and Dionigi Albera. "Pilgrimage Studies in Global Perspective." In New Pathways in Pilgrimage Studies: Global Perspectives, eds. Dionigi Albera and John Eade. London: Routledge, 2016.

Jacobsen, Knut A. Pilgrimage in the Hindu Tradition: Salvific Space. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.

Mahoney, Rosemary. The Singular Pilgrim: Travels on Sacred Ground. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2003.

Pitt Rivers Museum. "Hindu facial markings." Body Arts. <http://web.prm.ox.ac.uk/bodyarts/index.php/temporary-body-arts/body-painting/191-hindu-facial-markings.html> (accessed March 28, 2019).

 
Jewelled terminal of aestel (The Alfred Jewel). Britain, 871–899 AD. Cloisonné enamel, gold, rock crystal. The Ashmolean Museum, Presented by the Estate of Colonel Nathaniel Palmer, 1718 [AN1836.p135.371]

Jewelled terminal of aestel (The Alfred Jewel). Britain, 871–899 AD. Cloisonné enamel, gold, rock crystal. The Ashmolean Museum, Presented by the Estate of Colonel Nathaniel Palmer, 1718 [AN1836.p135.371]

Reliquary casket of Saint Thomas Becket. Limoges, c. 1190. Gilt copper alloy, champlevé enamel and wood. The Ashmolean Museum, Bequeathed by J. Francis Mallett, 1947 [AN2008.36]

Reliquary casket of Saint Thomas Becket. Limoges, c. 1190. Gilt copper alloy, champlevé enamel and wood. The Ashmolean Museum, Bequeathed by J. Francis Mallett, 1947 [AN2008.36]

Episode 9: “Sights for Sore Eyes: Reading the Senses in Religious and Cultural Pilgrimage” – PART 1

In this episode, Raphaela Rohrhofer (DPhil Student, English) uses the Alfred Jewel and the reliquary casket of St Thomas Becket to explore the significance of the senses in reading and travelling to centres of culture and spiritual salvation. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Jasmine Proteau (DPhil Student, History). Listen to Episode 10 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Antoine, Élizabeth et al (eds.) Catalogue international de l'oeuvre de Limoges. Corpus des émaux méridionaux, vol. II: L'apogée 1190–1215 (Paris, 2011).

Barnes, Phil. Engraving and Enamelling: The Art of Champlevé (Ramsbury, 2019).

Caudron, Simone. “La diffusion des chasses de saint Thomas Becket dans l'Europe médiévale”, in Gaborit-Chopin Danielle et al (eds.) L'Oeuvre de Limoges et sa diffusion. Trésors, objets, collections. (Rennes, 2011), pp. 23–41.

Gauthier, Marie-Madeleine. 'Le meurtre dans la cathédrale, thème iconographique médiéval', in Raymonde Foreville (ed.) Thomas Becket. Actes du Colloque international de Sédières, 19–24 Aout, 1973 (Paris, 1975): pp. 247–53. 

Hahn, Cynthia. “Production, Prestige, and Patronage of Medieval Enamels” in Colum Hourihane (ed.) From Minor to Major. The Minor Arts in Medieval Art History (University Park, PA, 2012), pp. 152–168.

Hinton, David. The Alfred Jewel and Other Late Anglo-Saxon Decorated Metalwork (Oxford, 2008).

Keynes, Simon. "The Alfred Jewel", in Breay, Claire and Joanna Story (eds.) Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War (London, 2018), p. 185.

O’Neill, John Philip (ed.) Enamels of Limoges 1100–1350 (New York, 1996). 

Wilson, David M. Anglo-Saxon: Art from the Seventh Century to the Norman Conquest (London, 1984).

Zarnecki, George, Janet Holt, and Tristram Holland (eds.). English Romanesque Art 1066–1200 (London, 1984).  

https://www.ashmolean.org/alfred-jewel
https://www.ashmolean.org/reliquary-casket-st-thomas-becket
https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/zw3wxnb/revision/1
https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/middle_ages/becket_01.shtml
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alfred_the_great.shtml
http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/oxford/hi/people_and_places/history/newsid_8665000/8665593.stm
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-31064615
https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/alfred-jewel
https://www.bl.uk/people/alfred-the-great
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O80222/the-becket-casket-casket-unknown/
https://newatlas.com/the-yorkshire-aestel--one-of-the-original-knowledge-gizmos-to-go-under-the-hammer/10031/
http://www.teachinghistory100.org/objects/about_the_object/king_alfreds_jewel
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~eets/

 
 
Silver cased quarter-striking coach watch with quarter-repeat. Made by Lorenz Beitelrock. Lublin, c.1760. The Ashmolean Museum, Eric Bullivant Bequest, 1974 [WA1974.216]

Silver cased quarter-striking coach watch with quarter-repeat. Made by Lorenz Beitelrock. Lublin, c.1760. The Ashmolean Museum, Eric Bullivant Bequest, 1974 [WA1974.216]

 

Episode 10: “Sights for Sore Eyes: Reading the Senses in Religious and Cultural Pilgrimage” – PART 2

In this episode, Jasmine Proteau (DPhil Student, History) uses an eighteenth-century carriage clock to explore the significance of the senses in reading and travelling to centres of culture and spiritual salvation. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Raphaela Rohrhofer (DPhil Student, English). Listen to Episode 9 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Primary Sources

Starke, Mariana. Letters from Italy. London : Printed by T. Gillet for R. Phillips, 1800.

Starke, Mariana. Travels in Italy, between the years 1792 and 1798; containing a view of the late revolutions in that country. Likewise pointing out the matchless works of art which still embellish Pisa, Florence, Siena, Rome, Naples, Bologna, Venice, &c. With instructions for the use of invalids and families who may not choose to incur the expence [sic] attendant upon travelling with a courier. Also a supplement comprising instructions for travelling in France, with descriptions of all the principal roads and cities in that republic. London: Philips, 1802.

Starke, Mariana. Travels on the continent: written for the use and particular information of Travellers. London: John Murray, 1820.

Starke, Mariana. Letters to John Murray, publishers, of correspondents with surnames and company names from Staples to Starke, Unpublished letters. 1827. MS. 41151, John Murray Archive, The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh.

Starke, Mariana. Travels in Europe between the Years 1824-1828; adapted to the use of travellers; and comprising an historical account of Sicily with a guide for strangers in that Island. Vol 1. Leghorn: Glaucus Masi, 1828.

Starke, Mariana. Travels in Europe and in the Island of Sicily [With] an Account of the remains of ancient Italy, and of the roads leading to those remains. 9th ed. enlarged, Paris: A. and W. Galignani and Co., 1836.

Starke, Mariana. Travels in Europe: For the use of Travellers on the Continent and Likewise in the Island of Sicily, 9th ed. Paris: A. and W. Galignani and Co., 1839.

Secondary Sources

“226. Lorenz Beitelrock: Silver cased quarter-striking coach watch with quarter repeat.” Label and Object Description. Silver Gallery, Second Floor. Ashmolean Museum.

Baumgartner, Karin. “Travel, Tourism, and Cultural Identity in Mariana Starke's Letters from Italy (1800) and Goethe's Italienische Reise (1816–17).” Publications Of The English Goethe Society. 83:3, 2014. pp. 177–195.

Bird, Dúnlaith. "Travel writing and gender" in Travel Writing. Carl (Carl Edward) Thompson ed., Abingdon: Routledge, 2016.

Brister, Lori. Looking for the Picturesque: Tourism, Visual Culture, and the Literature of Travel in the Long Nineteenth Century. The George Washington University, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015.

Buzard, James. The Beaten Track: European Tourism, Literature, and the Ways to ‘Culture’, 1800–1918. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.

Goodwin, Gráinne, Johnston, Gordon. “Guidebook publishing in the nineteenth century: John Murray's Handbooks for Travellers.” Studies in Travel Writing. 17:1, 2013. pp.43–61.

Pickford, Susan. “The Page as Private/Public Space in Mariana Starke’s Travel Writings on Italy.” In Travel Writing, Form, and Empire: The Poetics and Politics of Mobility. Julia Kuehn and Paul Smethurst eds. Routledge Research in Travel Writing. Peter Hulme and Tim Youngs series eds. London: Routledge, 2009.

Schaff, Barbara. "John Murray's Handbook to Italy: Making Tourism Literary" in Literary Tourism and Nineteenth-Century Culture Nicola J. Watson ed. New York: Palgrave Macmillan 2009.

Smith, Alan. The Country Life International Dictionary of Clocks. London: Country Life Books, 1979.

 
 
The Holy Face. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618–1682). c. 1665. Oil on canvas. The Ashmolean Museum, On loan from a private collection, 2017 [L197.8]

The Holy Face. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618–1682). c. 1665. Oil on canvas. The Ashmolean Museum, On loan from a private collection, 2017 [L197.8]

 

Episode 11: “Stripping Back to Sharpen the Senses: A Holy Face and a Waterfall Vase” – PART 1

In this episode, Eleanor Townsend (DPhil Student, History of Art) focuses on a seventeenth-century Spanish painting to demonstrate how artists can engage our senses by deliberately focusing on an artificial, pared down approach. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Yayoi Teramoto Kimura (DPhil Student, Computational Neuroscience). Listen to Episode 12 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Murillo y los capuchinos de Sevilla (exh. cat.), Marqués Ferrer, V. (ed.), Museo de Bellas Artes de Sevilla, 2017, cat. no. 9.

A. Casper, ‘Display and Devotion: Exhibiting Icons and Their Copies in Counter-Reformation Italy’, in Religion and the Senses in Early Modern Europe, de Boer, W and Gottler, C (eds.), Leiden and Boston, 2013, pp.43–62.

 
 
Vase with waterfall over rocks. Namikawa Yasuyuki (1845–1927). Japan, 1910–1915. Metal, with  shakudō , and inlaid with silver wire  cloisonné  enamel. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased with the assistance of an anonymous benefactor, 2002 [EA2002.177]

Vase with waterfall over rocks. Namikawa Yasuyuki (1845–1927). Japan, 1910–1915. Metal, with shakudō, and inlaid with silver wire cloisonné enamel. The Ashmolean Museum, Purchased with the assistance of an anonymous benefactor, 2002 [EA2002.177]

 

Episode 12: “Stripping Back to Sharpen the Senses: A Holy Face and a Waterfall Vase” – PART 2

In this episode, Yayoi Teramoto Kimura (DPhil Student, Computational Neuroscience) focuses on a twentieth-century Japanese vase to demonstrate how artists can engage our senses by deliberately focusing on an artificial, pared down approach. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Eleanor Townsend (DPhil Student, History of Art). Listen to Episode 11 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

On the object:

Vase with waterfall over rocks: http://jameelcentre.ashmolean.org/collection/4/867/874/12187

On the artist, Namikawa Yasuyuki:

Nice extracts from different texts describing his workshop: http://www.smokingsamurai.com/NAMIKAWA_YASUYUKI.html

A nice article written around the time of an exhibition “Namikawa Yasuyuki and Japanese Cloisonne” at the Teien Art Museum in 2017:
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2017/02/07/arts/yasuyuki-namikawa-master-cloisonne-color-design/#.XNlKFqZ7nOR

On the technique, cloisonné enamelling:

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/h/history-of-cloisonne-enamels-in-japan-1838-1871/

On the wider artistic context during the Meiji Period:

https://www.mayfairgallery.com/blog/japanese-meiji-period-art-antiques

Some videos that describe other aspects of cloisonné enamel:

https://youtu.be/EJjNBHqdxKY
https://youtu.be/GWTTPm2doDA

 

View Angela Palmer’s Ashmolean Mummy Boy 3 (lying on his back) (2011) on the artist’s website.

Episode 13: “Making Sense of Death” – PART 1

In this episode, Dr Carrie Ryan (Postdoctoral Researcher, Anthropology) uses Angela Palmer’s Ashmolean Mummy Boy 3 (lying on his back) (2011) to explore how ancient and contemporary cultures use the senses to make sense of death. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Alexis Gorby (DPhil Student, Archaeology). Listen to Episode 14 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Field Museum (2017, November 28). Mummies Exhibition tells unique story of the well-known practice. Field Museum. Retireved from: https://www.fieldmuseum.org/about/press/mummies-exhibition-tells-unique-story-well-known-practice

Foucault, M., & Sheridan, A. (1976). The birth of the clinic : an archaeology of medical perception. London: Tavistock.

Naudus, Kris (2017). ‘Museums use CT scans to take the mystery out of mummies: a little less magic and a lot more science.’ Engadget UK. Retireved from: https://www.engadget.com/2017/03/20/mummies-museum/?guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAADAacDzf7V9JiVpV_wX-mAhchziiaky8tZeAU8RNxU954GnvNBa9tvuQZZ3j0UlFfSI2-FFTY81Bl81mcjrhBIsIrbwwXf7mL_PEj2ODhrlQfZrbbm_b8OMFYBjrtfqEHWifLIvGjJ-B0h3DS6aWXl7dQhI83BBlRnoIMe93LQrW&guccounter=1

Palmer, Angela (2008). Angela Palmer: Unravelled. [Exhibition Catalog]. Exhibited at Waterhouse & Dodd, London. Retrieved from: https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/96fa2d_f48238e5b49c4af1b69da4e28d0b5521.pdf

Riggs, C. (2014). Unwrapping ancient Egypt. London: Bloomsbury.

Thompson, Theresa (2008, August 6). ‘Slices of time.’The Oxford Times. Retrieved from: https://www.oxfordtimes.co.uk/news/2418887.slices-of-time/

 
 
Gold-glass roundel from the centre of a plate. Rome. The Ashmolean Museum [AN2007.13]

Gold-glass roundel from the centre of a plate. Rome. The Ashmolean Museum [AN2007.13]

 

Episode 14: “Making Sense of Death” – PART 2

In this episode, Alexis Gorby (DPhil Student, Archaeology) looks at glass from the Roman catacombs to explore how ancient and contemporary cultures use the senses to make sense of death. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Dr Carrie Ryan (Postdoctoral Researcher, Anthropology). Listen to Episode 13 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Ferrari, G., & Morey, C. (1959). The gold-glass collection of the Vatican Library: with additional catalogues of other gold-glass collections (Catalogo del Museo Sacro della Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana; v.4). Città del Vaticano: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana.

Grig, L. (2018). Life and Death in Late Antiquity: Religious Rituals and Popular Culture. In J. Lössl and J. Baker-Brian (eds) A companion to religion in Late Antiquity: 455–473. Chichester, Blackwell.

Hamilakis, Y. (2011). Archaeologies of the Senses. In T. Insoll (ed) The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual and Religion: 209–225. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Howells, D., Entwistle, C., & James, L. (2015). A catalogue of the Late Antique gold glass in the British Museum. London, British Museum.

Jensen, R. (2008). Dining with the Dead: From the Mensa to the Altar in Christian Late Antiquity. In L. Brink and D. Green (eds) Commemorating the Dead: Texts and Artifacts in Context: 107–143. Berlin/Boston, De Gruyter.

Lewis, N. D. (2017). Popular Christianity and Lived Religion in Late Antique Rome: Seeing Magic in the Catacombs. In L. Grig (ed) Popular culture in the ancient world: 257–276. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Potter, D. (2014). The Social Life of the sense: Feasts and Funerals. In J. Toner (ed) A cultural history of the senses in antiquity: 23–44. London, Bloomsbury Academic.

Rebillard, E. (2009). The care of the dead in late antiquity. Ithaca, Cornell University Press.

Walker, S., Leatherbury, S., & Rini, D. (2017). Saints and salvation: The Wilshere Collection of gold-glass, sarcophagi and inscriptions from Rome and Southern Italy. Oxford, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford.

 
Piece of undyed linen cloth decorated with woven wool tapestry. Akhmim, Egypt, 300–500 AD. The Ashmolean Museum [AN1888.749]

Piece of undyed linen cloth decorated with woven wool tapestry. Akhmim, Egypt, 300–500 AD. The Ashmolean Museum [AN1888.749]

Head-covering made in the ‘sprang’ technique in purple wool with yellow and green patterning. Akhmim, Egypt, c. 400–600 AD. The Ashmolean Museum, Gift of Reverend G.J. Chester [AN1888.1181]

Head-covering made in the ‘sprang’ technique in purple wool with yellow and green patterning. Akhmim, Egypt, c. 400–600 AD. The Ashmolean Museum, Gift of Reverend G.J. Chester [AN1888.1181]

Episode 15: “The Rough and the Refined: Sensing the Luxurious and the Everyday” – PART 1

In this episode, Clare Gardom (DPhil Student, Classics) explores how textual sources and archaeological evidence can differ in how they portray the senses in grand and ordinary living, through examining textiles from Classical Egypt. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Dr Juanjo García-Granero (Postdoctoral Researcher, Archaeology). Listen to Episode 16 for the second half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Clement’s Paedagogus: http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/0209.htm

Diogenes Laertius: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0258%3Abook%3D1%3Achapter%3Dprologue

Pliny’s Natural History: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Plin.+Nat.+toc

Philostratus’ Imagines: https://www.theoi.com/Text/PhilostratusElder1A.html

 Long, A. (1982). Soul and Body in Stoicism. Phronesis, 27(1–2), 34–57.

Baginski, A., & Tidhar, A. (1980). Textiles from Egypt, 4th–13th centuries C.E. Jerusalem: L.A. Mayer Memorial Institute for Islamic Art.

Thomas, T. (1990). Textiles from medieval Egypt, A.D. 300–1300 (Carnegie series on Egypt). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Thomas, T., Ball, J., & Bleiberg, E. (2016). Designing identity: The power of textiles in late antiquity. Princeton.

 
Knobbed jug and cooking tripod with lid. Corridor of the Bays, Knossos, Crete, 1750–1700 BC. The Ashmolean Museum, Gift of A.J. Evans [AE.819, 1180]

Knobbed jug and cooking tripod with lid. Corridor of the Bays, Knossos, Crete, 1750–1700 BC. The Ashmolean Museum, Gift of A.J. Evans [AE.819, 1180]

Episode 16: “The Rough and the Refined: Sensing the Luxurious and the Everyday” – PART 2

In this episode, Dr Juanjo García-Granero (Postdoctoral Researcher, Archaeology) explores how textual sources and archaeological evidence can differ in how they portray the senses in grand and ordinary living, through examining a Minoan cooking vessel. Originally delivered as the first half of a gallery talk in partnership with Clare Gardom (DPhil Student, Classics). Listen to Episode 15 for the first half of the talk.

Further Reading:

Halstead, P. (1995). Late Bronze Age grain crops and Linear B ideograms* 65,* 120, and* 121. Annual of the British School at Athens90, 229–234.

Livarda, A., & Kotzamani, G. (2013). The archaeobotany of Neolithic and Bronze Age Crete: synthesis and prospects. Annual of the British School at Athens108, 1–29.

Sarpaki, A. (2001). Condiments, perfume and dye plants in Linear B: A look at the textual and archaeobotanical evidence. In Manufacture and Measurement: Counting, Measuring and Recording Craft Items in Early Aegean Societies, edited by A. Michailidou, pp. 195–265. Athens.